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Newton couple honored as ’Parents of the Year’ by DSS
By Jennifer Roy/ Daily News Tribune
Newton, Massachusetts
Wednesday, August 9, 2006

James Bryant and Stuart Sadick were heartbroken when they learned that after a year and a half of caring for their foster child - a baby seized from his drug-addicted mother - they might have to give him up.

Christian was three months premature and weighed 2 1/2 pounds when was taken into custody by the Department of Social Services three years ago.

Bryant and Sadick were married in June 2004 and had discussed becoming parents early in their relationship. They had even been completed a DSS parenting class.

"We thought about fostering children and adoption, and decided we were intent to adopt through DSS," Sadick, 50, said.

Bryant said the couple completed the training in summer of 2003 and were contacted about Christian the following October.

"You finish the training and then wonder, ’Where’s my child?’" he said. "It seems like a long time."

But Christian was not legally free for adoption. His birth parents and their families were fighting to keep the baby, and DSS was working with them to make sure that happened, Bryant said.

"Our plans to adopt a legally free child went out the window once we met Christian," he said. "I was a goner after three days of holding him."

The couple had been expecting to adopt an older child, but brought the infant into their Fairmont Avenue home when he was just about 4 months old.

"Christian was not legally available, but he needed a foster home," Sadick said.

While they were foster parents, Bryant - a stay-at-home dad - brought Christian for weekly visits with his birth parents at DSS in Chelsea.

Then, Christian’s birth mother "was able to start getting her life together," and the couple thought they would have to give Christian back.

Sadick said there were several hearings regarding Christian’s fate, but, a year ago, the couple worked out an open adoption agreement in which Sadick and Bryant take Christian to see his birth parents every couple of months.

"I get a kick out of seeing him with his birth mother and father. It’s clear they love him very much," Sadick said. "He’s a pretty strong little guy. He recognizes and knows them, but doesn’t know yet who they are."

Christian is now a curious, wide-eyed 3-year-old who likes to feast on hard-boiled eggs and French fries and who calls his parents Daddy James and Daddy Stuart.

Bryant said his exuberant son "has a way of making friends and of making people feel good."

Bryant and Sadick, who met in Provincetown 17 years ago, were recently honored by DSS as two of their Adoptive Parents of the Year.

"We were surprised and honored," Sadick said.

He said the day after Christian’s adoption was finalized, DSS officials approached the couple about adopting a second child.

Their families would like them to bring a little girl into their home, Bryant said.

"There are times at 3 a.m., I realize why most people have children in their 20s," said Bryant, 46.

Sadick said the couple simply wants to enjoy the time they spend with Christian right now, but will consider adopting an older child through DSS in the future. They are nervous, however, at the possibility of almost losing another child.

"There were times when we wanted to scream," Bryant said.

Sadick, a headhunter, said he and Bryant will always be open with their children about how they became a family.

"They have a need and a right to know their birth family, if possible," he said. "They will know they are adopted and they will know they are loved."

Said Bryant of their story so far, "it has such a happy ending."

Your state government at work:

Massachusetts Department of Social Services (DSS) honors "married" male couple as "Parents of the Year" -- asks them to adopt another child!

AUGUST 12, 2006 - The brave new world is here in Massachusetts. And caught in the crosshairs are the very smallest of children. The children are the ultimate victims of this bizarre social experiment being pushed on us by our government. And as usual, it's being run by a Republican governor, who controls the Dapartment of Social Services.

The Massachusetts state government agency responsible for removing children from (what they may perceive as) dangerous and abusive homes -- and putting them into foster homes, or up for adoption -- has honored a male homosexual "married" couple as its "Parents of the Year."

This really sends a chilling message -- from the Romney Administration (and the liberal establishment) to you.

As most people know, the Mass. Dept. of Social Services (DSS) is no ordinary government agency. It has a hideous and fearsome reputation for using the force of law to arbitrarily take children from their homes at the slightest provocation (we're not exaggerating) and place them in foster homes, or even up for adoption, using the force of some of the most twisted and misguided laws in the nation. The stories are legendary, of a teacher or neighbor or anyone "suspecting" child abuse and reporting it to the DSS. Then their agents come to the home, often with police, and can just take a child away. Our friend Greg Hession, an attorney who specializes in DSS cases, has put together an excellent website for parents targeted by DSS at: http://www.massoutrage.com.

More than that, even under a series of Republican governors, DSS has become a magnet for homosexual activists throughout their ranks. We've talked to people on the inside who've had chilling horror stories to tell about that. It's widely estimated that 40% of their adoptions go to homosexual couples (tho we haven't been able to verify that yet).

When you read the newspaper article at left, be sure to note the following:

  • The newspaper reporter carefully portrays this as simply a "Newton couple" and nothing out of the ordinary. There's something really eerie about this. It's as if there's nothing unusual at all about two men "married" to each other in a homosexual relationship raising a small child as if they were a man and woman. This is extremely biased reporting, though in a very insidiously subtle way.
  • The article mentions that "The birth parents and their families were fighting to keep the baby." And DSS worked to make sure they lost that battle through pressure, threats, negotiation or whatever methods they used. Now the parents only get to see their son every few months, and their son "doesn't know yet who they are." All the time these parents do know that their son's perception of normalcy is being molded by two men in a romantic and sexual relationship with each other. Your tax dollars at work, as they say.
  • We've been told by other adoptive parents that the standard benchmark for adopting children is that neither of the parents are more than 40 years older than the child. The boy is three. One man is 43 and the other is 50.
  • According to the article, "the day after Christian’s adoption was finalized, DSS officials approached the couple about adopting a second child". How many people are waiting for years for the opportunity to adopt a child, some needing to go overseas?

Something is very wrong here. And something very selfish and self-centered. This is really all about the two men, in their (can we say it?) dysfunctional relationship who want to raise children as if they were a mother and father. The emotional and psychological well-being of the young children isn't even taken into consideration. The political and social agenda reigns supreme.

But will any government leaders stand up and even say something?  Don't hold your breath!

We telephoned the Department of Social Services to ask them about this. We spoke to two different people. They were polite, and acknowledged that some people might have differing beliefs on this, but couldn't understand that there's anything wrong about it. One person calmly tried to assure us that all kinds of studies have shown that there's simply no difference between a man and a woman raising children, and two men. And that's that. How was the award determined? They said they didn't know, and didn't know who to ask.